June 2017 Archives

Wage and hour disputes garner less attention than shoplifting

The federal minimum wage per hour is about enough to buy one meal at a Tennessee fast food restaurant. Those working minimum wage jobs often count on every penny to meet their obligations. Nevertheless, among many employers, wage and hour disputes seem to carry considerably less weight than preventing shoplifting. In fact, a recent study compared losses due to shoplifting with the loss workers feel when paid unfair wages.

Court rules on church exemption from ERISA

When Congress passed the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, guidelines were set to protect citizens in Tennessee and across the country from unscrupulous fiduciaries concerning benefits offered by private industries. In 1980, Congress decided that ERISA laws do not include those benefits offered by churches. Recently, participants in several church-affiliated health plans challenged this exception as it related to their employers. Their argument went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but the employers prevailed.

Mass torts can bring unusual claims

What is the value of a life? Apparently, according to some gamers, it is worth filing mass torts against game makers who deny those lives. While to some, it may seem trivial to file a lawsuit for the value of an online life, to others, it is a matter of principal. After all, when nearly 100 million people world wide play a particular game, including many in Tennessee, the value of a life may equal millions of dollars for the game maker.

Wage and hour disputes common in food service industry

In Tennessee and across the country, employment in the food services industry is often a thankless job. The hours can be long, the work is often grueling and the pay nominal. When that pay is illegally withheld, it can lead to wage and hour disputes. Recent investigations show that restaurant and food truck workers may be shortchanged on a regular basis.

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Jones And Stennett

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