Mass torts can bring unusual claims

What is the value of a life? Apparently, according to some gamers, it is worth filing mass torts against game makers who deny those lives. While to some, it may seem trivial to file a lawsuit for the value of an online life, to others, it is a matter of principal. After all, when nearly 100 million people world wide play a particular game, including many in Tennessee, the value of a life may equal millions of dollars for the game maker.

The class action lawsuit was filed by a man who has been playing Candy Crush for over five years. Beginning with five lives, gamers work their way through various levels of the game, losing a life for each unsuccessful attempt to meet the level's goals. When all lives are lost, players can wait 30 minutes for lives to regenerate, purchase five new lives for 99 cents or ask fellow gamers to donate lives.

Several of the man's gaming friends frequently donated lives so he could continue playing. However, the gamer began to notice that the donated lives, instead of accumulating in his queue, suddenly began to disappear when he logged out of the game. Other Candy Crush fans across the country noticed this, too.

The operator of Candy Crush admits it removed the lives, but claims there was no injury to the man or others playing the game. However, a court disagreed, ruling that the company places a value on the lives by offering them for sale for about 20 cents each. While 20 cents a life is not substantial damages on an individual level, the plaintiff still may be able to prove that he suffered some injury.

Sometimes a class action lawsuit brings necessary relief to people who suffer greatly from the irresponsible actions of larger entities. In other cases, such lawsuits can be used to send a message to a multimillion-dollar company that is trying to take advantage of consumers a few pennies at a time. The best way for those in Tennessee to determine if they have grounds for mass torts claims is to consult an attorney experienced in handling these types of cases.

Source: cincinnati.com, "Candy Crush just lost a life in class-action case", Jack Greiner, June 5, 2017

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